Poshmark Tips & Tricks: How I’ve Made $1,000+ Selling Clothes

First, what is Poshmark? Well, I first wrote a post on Poshmark almost four years ago when I had recently found the app. To recap, Poshmark is a super easy-to-use app that allows anyone to sell clothes, accessories, and makeup. Since its beginning in 2011, it’s expanded to selling not only women’s clothing but men’s and children’s as well.  It’s also expanded to a desktop-friendly website in addition to its original app. But if you’re reading this, you’re probably here to find out how I’ve made $1,000+ with Poshmark!

Poshmark Tips & Tricks: How I've Made $1,000+ Selling Clothes

I’ve been using Poshmark for more than five years now, so I’ve learned a few tips and tricks along the way. Poshmark is a unique app and takes some time to figure out, but once you do, it’s such an easy way to gain a little cash!

Following

Don’t be afraid to follow people. This isn’t Instagram, people. Following people is how others find you, so essentially the more you follow, the more will see your products.

Probably my biggest trick: Find people that are looking for what you’re selling before they find you. The easiest way to do this is to find buyers that are liking items similar/exactly like you’re selling. For example, if you’re selling a ‘Lilly Pulitzer Fiesta Pink Dress,’ search for that on the Poshmark database. You’ll most likely find a handful of other sellers selling the exact dress that you’re selling. Go look at who liked that post and follow them. That way they’ll get a notification, check out your profile and realize you’re selling their dream item, for even cheaper! Don’t forget to look at “sold” items, too! Maybe someone was really hoping to get that dress but it sold before their paycheck came! Go follow them so they can see your post.

Sharing

Sharing is caring! Okay, you might not want to share your bottle of rose on Wine Wednesday, but sharing on Poshmark is how you’re gonna make friends. If someone shares your post, share one of theirs. It’s just like Twitter and Facebook, the more that share your post, the more that will see it. Because there’s no real way to see all of the posts you’ve ever shared, it’s not like Twitter or Facebook in the sense that you need to keep up an aesthetic or theme. If you share others’ items, its likely they’ll share you, thus spreading the word of your items.

It’s also important to share your own items. Poshmark has “parties” every day where you share specific items. The parties happen at 11am, 2pm, 6pm, and 9pm CST every day. The first 3 parties of the day have category themes, like “Makeup,” or brand restrictions like “Boho: Free People, Urban Outfitters, and Forever21.” These are great places to share to to get shoppers to see your items! The party at 9pm every night is a free-for-all. No brand or category restrictions, so it’s a great way to get exposure to your own items and sharing others’! The moral of the story is to share share share!

Titles

Titles are so important. If you’re a blogger, marketer or anyone creating content you know Search Engine Optimization is how you’ll get seen. For example, if you want your Free People tank top to get seen, you wouldn’t simply write “tank top.” You wouldn’t even write “flowy tank top.” You want to include as much detail as possible to capture the largest audience. The perfect title would be something like “Purple Free People Tank Top Size Small.” Sometimes, especially for designer items, people will search for the exact names the retailer calls the item on their website. So if you know there is a special name for the style of tank that the retailer calls it, you could write “Free People We The Free Peachy Tee Tank.”

Descriptions

For faster posting, use a description template. I did this and it became so much easier when posting multiple items in one sitting. Here’s an example:

This [brand] [type of clothing] is a size __ and is [color]. It’s been worn only [# of times] and there are/are not any flaws, stains or pilling (pictured). I loved wearing it to [event]! Make me an offer I can’t refuse! (Sorry, not taking any trades at this time!)

It’s important to be honest in descriptions. If a shirt you’re selling has a stain, be sure to mention it in the description as well as adding a picture pointing out the flaw. You’d be surprised what people will still buy, even if there are flaws. However, if you simply withhold information about flaws, you’ll end up with poor reviews and others will be less likely to buy from you. If something you’re selling has a stain you might be able to get rid of with a little dry cleaning, go the extra mile and get that done- your buyers will respect you!

Mention as many details as you can about the item in the description. For example, if the dress you’re selling has a specific name for the color (i.e. Sea Foam) be sure to mention that in case someone is looking for that exact color!

Images

Images are key to selling on Poshmark. Sure, titles and descriptions will get people in the “door,” but what will get people to buy? Good images. Now, not all of us have a photography studio to shoot our items (isn’t that why we’re selling on Poshmark and not in boutiques anyways?!). But you do need to make sure to post the best quality images possible. Here are a few tips to help:

  • Good lighting. Take pictures in natural light during the day for the best images.
  • Location. I like to hang my garments on a door hinge so buyers can see the full length of the item rather than laying in on the floor. If it’s jewelry or accessories, I’ll lay them out either on my white desk or my white bedspread to eliminate distractions.
  • Details. If your item has lots of pockets or zippers or any other details photograph all of them. It’s always better to have too many pictures than not enough (Fun fact: when I first started with Poshmark I think you could only post four pictures. Since then they’ve upped it to eight!)
  • Be honest. Like I mentioned above, take photos of any flaws, snags, pilling, stains, rips, etc. It’s better to show these upfront than to get a bad review or to get a returned item.
  • Show different angles. At the bare minimum show the front and back of the item. But if your item is something like shoes, be sure to show the angle from the front, side, back, bottom and top to ensure you’re covering all of your bases.
  • A photo wearing the item. If possible, post a photo wearing the item so the buyers can picture themselves wearing it. Why do you think clothing websites have models wearing the clothes and not just items on hangers?

Price

It’s always tricky pricing something when you have no idea what people will be willing to pay. The first thing to do is search for the item on Poshmark to see what other people are selling it for. If it’s a popular item, it’s likely already being sold, so make sure you’re selling it for equal or less than the other sellers. If it’s not on Poshmark yet, do a little Googling to see if you can find the original price of the item. Then, apply an appropriate discount. Depending on the condition of the item, I try to do at least 20% off, but if it has any flaws, I’ll do even more.

Well there ya have it, a few easy ways to making some cold, hard cash (well, virtual cold hard cash) on Poshmark! If you’re interested in checking out my items, you can find them here. If you’re ready to get started selling and buying, click here and use the code EMMALUCKY to save $5 immediately, how easy is that?

If you’re a fellow Posher, let me know your best selling tip and drop a link to your Poshmark store, either in a comment below, or on my latest Instagram! Happy Poshing!

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